News & Reports Archive

  • Once in the Prolinnova family... always in the Prolinnova family...

    Dharma Dangol has been an active member of Prolinnova-Nepal from its inception. He was also the Country Platform (CP) coordinator in the period during which the CP secretariat was hosted by the Natural History Museum of the Tribhuvan University in Kathmandu. Dharma retired in April this year but is committed to continuing the work of Prolinnova, especially in regards to integration of the approach into education at all levels. Dharma resides in the Kirtipur Municipality of Kathmandu and has started liaising with schools in the area, building on interactions he has had with some of them in the recent past.

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  • New Subregional Coordinator in Eastern & Southern Africa

    Brigid Letty has been appointed by ACDEP (Association of Church-based Development Projects), the NGO that coordinates the Proli-FaNS (Promoting local innovation for Food and Nutrition Security) project under the umbrella of the Prolinnova network, to take over the role as Subregional Coordinator (SRC) in Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA). She replaces Amanuel Assefa, who resigned as SRC as of 31 March 2019 because of a very heavy workload from other assignments.

    Brigid is an agricultural development specialist and Principle Scientist with the Institute of Natural Resources (INR) in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. She has a BSc in Agriculture (majoring in animal science) and an MSc focused on range and forage resources. She is doing research for a PhD in agroforestry systems at the University of KwaZulu-Natal (KZN).

  • FaReNE writeshop in Mali documents 3 years of experience

    The Farmer-led Research Network (FaReNe) project is a joint project of Prolinnova partners in Burkina Faso and Mali with financial support from the McKnight Foundation and technical support from the Royal Tropical Institute (KIT), host of the Prolinnova international secretariat. It looks at how best to organise and use farmer-led innovation approaches, such as Participatory Innovation Development (PID), Local Innovation Support Facility/Fund (LISF) and farmer networking, and how these can contribute to agro-ecological intensification. Approaching the end of the current funding cycle, key members of the partner organisations from the two countries – NGO staff, researchers and farmer organisation representatives – met for a writeshop to document their three years of experiences, share and analyse these together, and work towards well-written papers.

  • African farmer innovation in biopesticides against fall armyworm

    Fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda, FAW) has recently appeared in Africa, where it is threatening food security, as it infests maize, which is a staple crop in many countries. Farmer innovators in Ethiopia and Tanzania (among surely many others) are trying out different ways to combat this new pest. The 4-page report “Towards farmer-led bio-management of fall armyworm in Tanzania” describes how a group of small-scale farmers in Tanzania has been trying out a sugar solution, pig fat oil and palm oil as substances to attract ants as a bio-control agent in maize infested with FAW. The 4-page report “Biopesticide to control fall armyworm: local innovation by Gebreyesus Tesfay” describes how a small-scale farmer innovator in northern Ethiopia developed a biopesticide against FAW.

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